Tropical Kudzu

Pueraria phaseloides

 

Family: Fabaceae

Common name: Tropical Kudzu

Origin: native toSouthern China (Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Hainan Island, Hong Kong), Taiwan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Brunei, Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands.

Reference: Tropical Forages

Can I ID a plant from a sketch? I think so!

Matang Hipon

Breynia rhamnoides

Family: Euphorbiaceae/Phyllanthaceae
Common names: Indian snowberry
Distribution: found throughout the Philippines in low and medium altitudes, also occurs in India and Sri Lanka to China and Malaya
Reference: Stuartxchange


This started growing by itself beside the horse paddock. The bark and leaves have medicinal uses. The berries are eaten by birds.

This was initially misidentified as an edible plant Katuk Sauropus androgynus. I had my doubts about the ID after I ate a few leaves to confirm the ID. Did not taste edible!
2017-_0008-2

 

Looking Back at 2016

Some things were lost, some things were gained, and much was learned.

We went on overseas trips in March and May, in addition to many local birding trips throughout the rest of the year. As a result, I didn’t get to spend as much time on the farm as the previous year. We did mostly 1-day trips to the farm/sanctuary. My hagonoy eradication project fell by the wayside. On the plus side, I learned how to do less housework type chores during my short visits to the farm and more fun things like walking around with Momo and Barkley.

In July we had two harvests of mangoes! They were absolutely delicious! We offered some of the first harvest for sale and they were gone in a flash. The next harvest, we gave away to family and friends. People were eager to eat our all natural, un-sprayed, pesticide-free mangoes! Our mangoes stayed greenish on the outside but became very sweet and orange on the inside. People told us the fragrance and sweetness of our mangoes reminded them of the mangoes of their childhood.

We treated ourselves to some very cool tools and gadgets in 2016! We got a scope for birdwatching from the veranda, a digger for making more wildlife ponds, and a wildlife camera for observing the wildlife as unobtrusively as possible.

March 2016, when Tonji was figuring out how the little digger works! This is Pond No. 4 under construction.

This next video is from November 2016. The ponds are full of rainwater and the ducks Continue reading “Looking Back at 2016”